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National Honey Bee Day

BeeHive

We are all a buzz here at South Coast REC. Why? Well, tomorrow is National Honey Bee Day. Read more from Stephanie Parreira: August 19th is National Honey Bee Day: Dr. Elina Niño reminds us to help honey bees cope with pests —Stephanie...

Posted on Friday, August 18, 2017 at 3:42 PM

August 19th is National Honey Bee Day: Dr. Elina Niño reminds us to help honey bees cope with pests.

National Honey Bee Day is celebrated on the third Saturday of every August. This year it falls on Saturday the 19th. If you use integrated pest management, or IPM, you are probably aware that it can solve pest problems and reduce the use of pesticides that harm beneficial insects, including honey bees. But did you know that it is also used to manage pests that live inside honey bee colonies? In this timely podcast below, Dr. Elina Niño, UCCE apiculture extension specialist, discusses the most serious pests of honey bees, how beekeepers manage them to keep their colonies alive, and what you can do to help bees survive these challenges.

To hear the audio recording, click here

To read the full transcript of the audio, click here.

Successful IPM in honey bee colonies involves understanding honey bee pest biology, regularly monitoring for pests, and using a combination of different methods to control their damage. Visit these resources for more information:

For Beekeepers:

The California Master Beekeeper Program

EL Niño Bee Lab Courses

EL Niño Bee Lab Newsletter

For All Bee Lovers:

EL Niño Bee Lab Newsletter

Haagen Dazs Honey Bee Haven plant list

UC IPM Bee Precaution Pesticide Ratings and video tutorial

Sources for the Value of Honey Bees:

Calderone N. 2012. Insect-pollinated crops, Insect Pollinators and US Agriculture: Trend Analysis of Aggregate Data for the Period 1992–2009. 

Flottum K. 2017. U.S. Honey Industry Report, 2016.

A beekeeper carefully observes individual frames of a colony to monitor for pests and diseases; monitoring is one of the most important components of an effective IPM program. Photo by Elina Niño.

Posted on Friday, August 18, 2017 at 11:36 AM
Tags: bee colony (2), beekeeper (1), IPM (9)

Sunpreme raisins a hit at the UC Kearney Grape Day 2017

Excitement over the new Sunpreme raisins was evident at UC Kearney Grape Day Aug. 8, 2017. As soon as the tram stopped, dozens of farmers and other industry professionals rushed over to the vineyard to take a close look and sample the fruit. Raisins pulled from the vine were meaty with very little residual seed. The flavor was a deep, sweet floral with a muscat note.

Sunpreme raisins, bred by now-retired USDA breeder David Ramming, promise a nearly labor-free raisin production system. Traditionally, raisins are picked and placed on paper trays on the vineyard floor to dry. The development of dried-on-the-vine varieties opened the door to greater mechanization. Workers would cut the stems above clusters...

Read more.

Sunpreme raisins drying on their own in a Kearney vineyard.

Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 at 10:39 AM

LREC pathology laboratory supports project of two COS interns

IMG 20170804 111926

Since 2014, the new Lindcove Research and Extension Center pathology laboratory has provided the infrastructure for six College of the Sequoias (COS) undergraduate interns enrolled in the SURGE (Science Undergraduate Research Group Experience) program....

Posted on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 4:22 PM

Living with Wildlife at Hopland REC

In December 2016 we held our first workshop to share research and allow community conversation regarding ranching in an area rich in carnivores and the challenges that this poses. On August 31st we will be offering the follow up to this event, explaining current research efforts and the new data that has been collected on various methods of predator prevention.

We hope you can join us!

Living with Wildlife: New and Emerging Research

Date: August 31, 2017

Time: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM (Registration from 8:30am)

Event Details

A series of brief research updates by UC ANR and other UC colleagues will detail ongoing work in the science and history of non-lethal carnivore control. Field demonstrations will allow direct experience of traditional and emerging non-lethal tools, including fencing types, guardian dogs, turbo fladry, Foxlights and e-Shepherd collars. Facilitated dialogue among diverse participants will be integrated throughout the day's presentations including a rancher panel with representatives from the beef and lamb sector and from the coast to further inland. We look forward to hosting a range of speakers and participants, understanding new findings, building new partnerships, and moving toward solutions to manage for livestock and natural resource conservation. 

This workshop promises to be of value to ranchers, agencies, non-profits, researchers and all those with an interest in tackling the challenges associated with ranching in a landscape rich in wildlife.

We hope you can join us at Hopland for this important and exciting event!

$25 per person, includes lunch.
No one turned away due to lack of funds - email hbird@ucanr.edu for more details

Contact: Hannah Bird (707) 744 1424 ext 105 hbird@ucanr.edu

Sponsor: Hopland Research and Extension Center/UC Berkeley

Location: Rod Shippey Hall, UC Hopland Research and Extension Center 4070 University Road, Hopland CA 95449

 

Click here to register

Posted on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 8:29 AM
Tags: control (1), coyotes (1), predator (2), ranching (2), sheep (7), wildlife (4)

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