Research and Extension Center System
University of California
Research and Extension Center System

Posts Tagged: UCANR

SFREC Hosts 5th Annual Beef & Range Field Day

Clint Tipton shows students the hydraulic cattle chute.

On Thursday October 4th, Sierra Foothill REC hosted its 5th Annual Beef & Range Field Day for high school students enrolled in FFA & 4-H. Following an inspirational keynote address discussing possibilities after high school in...

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 10:14 AM
Tags: Beef Cattle (16), Education (23), FFA (5), Outreach (23), Ranchers (23), Range Management (4), SFREC (32), UCANR (44), Workshop (15)

UC Walks

U C Walks Photo:Left to Right-Dustin Flavell, Clint Tipton, Martin Beaton, Nikolai Schweitzer, Chris Feddersen, Mike Williams, Corrina Craigmill, & Ali Stefancich

Yesterday Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center staff employees participated in the 8th Annual University of California Walks Wellness event at the Yuba River Education Center. This UC-wide event is intended to develop, promote, and support...

U C Walks Photo:Left to Right-Dustin Flavell, Clint Tipton, Martin Beaton, Nikolai Schweitzer, Chris Feddersen, Mike Williams, Corrina Craigmill, & Ali Stefancich
U C Walks Photo:Left to Right-Dustin Flavell, Clint Tipton, Martin Beaton, Nikolai Schweitzer, Chris Feddersen, Mike Williams, Corrina Craigmill, & Ali Stefancich

U C Walks Photo:Left to Right-Dustin Flavell, Clint Tipton, Martin Beaton, Nikolai Schweitzer, Chris Feddersen, Mike Williams, Corrina Craigmill, & Ali Stefancich

Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 9:02 AM
  • Author: Nikolai Schweitzer
Tags: SFREC (32), UC Walks (1), UCANR (44)

Barn to Yarn this Saturday

From the Barn to the Yarn in Hopland

On Monday morning a group of 25 strangers gathered in front of the lambing barn at the UC Hopland Research and Extension Center. “If you survive the week, you'll be in a rare group” commented John Harper, Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor to the class. This heralds the beginning of the sheep shearing school, an intensive week long class, which is so eagerly anticipated that space on the class was filled in just 4 minutes from the opening of online registration.

The participants are varied and have traveled from all over the USA. As they introduce themselves they explain their motivations for joining this class and a common theme begins to emerge “there's just no one else to shear my sheep”. Many of the participants work with smaller sheep flocks and it is not economical to employ travelling shearers, used to shearing flocks of hundreds or thousands, for just a few sheep. These small flocks are increasing across Mendocino County and the need for qualified shearers who are sympathetic to the needs of small producers is high. The group mix might surprise some, with over 20 female participants and a number of the group using vacation from their “day job” to attend this class including a hair dresser looking to expand her scope. During the introduction it is made clear to all that shearing is not as easy task “a full day of shearing is equivalent to running a marathon” concluded Harper as he led the class into the barn to get started.

“One of my favorite things about this school is the range of people who are brought together for such an intensive experience” commented Hannah Bird, HREC community educator. “At the end of the week you always see such pride in their achievement, and the possibility of a new economic string to their bow, we're proud to see that being expressed in our community through Matt Gilbert and his family, a past shearing school participant who has now opened Mendocino Wool and Fiber, our local wool mill”.

Alongside a renewed interest in keeping small flocks of sheep, there has also been increased practice of fiber arts such as knitting and felting in the last 20 years, particularly amongst millennials. Celebrity knitters such as Julia Roberts and Cameron Diaz might be partly responsible, but the many qualities of wool as a fiber are greatly appreciated by local spinners, knitters and artists.

To get a taste of the entire process from sheep to scarf, HREC invites the community to their 4th annual Barn to Yarn celebration on Saturday, May 12th. There will be displays and demonstrations including herding sheep with a sheepdog (performed by Tom Trent from the Redwood Empire Sheepdog Association), shearing, knitting, felting, spinning and weaving.

“Our amazing team of experts and volunteers will help attendees at Barn to Yarn to try their hand working with wool – this is such a great day for all the family from kids to the committed fiber artist. We'll even be creating a beautiful shawl during the event which will be offered at silent auction through the day. What could be a better Mother's Day present?” added Bird. Guest of honor, Jean Near (103) will be adding to the event with stories of over 100 years living in Mendocino, ranching merino sheep which are prized for their wool over many of those years. Matthew Topsfield brings rare knitting skills all the way from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland which he will share with attendees who might enjoy making a “fisherman's gansey”.

Admission is $10 for adults, children under 12 $5. HREC asks visitors to leave their pets at home to protect the site and the sheep resident there. Bring your own picnic and all utensils; tea, coffee and water will be available. Visit http://bit.ly/BarntoYarn2018 to find out more and purchase your ticket. Barn to Yarn will be held at the Rod Shippey Hall, 4070 University Road, Hopland, CA 95449 from 9am-3pm on May 12th. For more information contact Hannah Bird, (707) 744-1424, Ext. 105, hbird@ucanr.edu.  

Posted on Monday, May 7, 2018 at 3:43 PM
Tags: Sheep (1), Sheep Meat and Wool (1), UCANR (44), wool (1)

Teachers go back to School to buff up on Science

Teachers practice one of Project WET's lessons. This kind of hands-on experience makes them more likely to use a lesson in their own classroom.

Last month, teachers and educators from around Northern California came together for a weekend to learn about best practices for science education with a Forestry Institute for Teachers+ (FIT+) workshop. FIT+ is a new professional development program...

Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2016 at 9:48 AM
Tags: Education (23), FIT+ (1), Outdoor Recreation (3), Outreach (23), Project WET (1), SFREC (32), Teacher training (1), UCANR (44)

Irrigated Pasture Forage Production Project

Figure 1: H11-21, Cage B, 4-6 inches treatment on the left and Total Forage Production treatment on the right. Photo credit: Nikolai Schweitzer

The Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center in Browns Valley, CA utilizes 130 acres of summer irrigated pasture for cattle grazing. SFREC's irrigation water is supplied by a local water district via pipelines and open ditch distribution...

Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 11:06 AM
  • Author: Nikolai Schweitzer

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: djkrause@ucanr.edu