Research and Extension Center System
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Research and Extension Center System

Posts Tagged: pests

Summer—it’s a time for swimming, BBQs, camping, and eating invasive species.

Last week during California Invasive Species Action Week (June 2 – June 10), we highlighted several pests, but there are many more invasive species out there. Now that you know about them, share your knowledge of invasive species with others. And no matter what your summer plans, here are some things YOU can do about invasive species from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and California Department of Food and Agriculture.

 

YOU:  I'M TRAVELLING TO AMAZING PLACES

 

YOU:  I'LL BE WORKING IN MY GARDEN

 

YOU:  I'LL BE NEAR THE WATER OR ON A BOAT

 

YOU:  I'LL BE OUT AND ABOUT CAMPING, HIKING, OR RIDING HORSES

 

YOU:  I'LL DEFINITELY CONTINUE TO LEARN ABOUT INVASIVES

  • Get to know your local invaders.
  • Learn about California's invasive plants.
  • Find out which species are threats to California.
  • Learn alternatives to releasing unwanted fish, aquatic plants, and other pets.
  • Eat them. Yum. Check out these websites to find out who is edible and how to prepare them.

If you missed it this year, help in the fight next year by learning and participating during California Invasive Species Action Week.

 

If you've got a great recipe for wild fennel, the website Eat the Invaders wants to know. Wild fennel is listed as moderately invasive by the California Invasive Plant Council (CAL-IPC). It came from southern Europe and the Mediterranean where it is used as a spice. (Photo: Joseph M. DiTomaso, UC Davis Dept. of Plant Sciences)
If you've got a great recipe for invasive brown garden snail, the website Eat the Inbaders wants to know. Don't bring snails and other animals into California for food! That's how the brown garden snail ended up here in the 1850's. (Photo: Jack Kelly Clark, UC IPM)

Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2018 at 10:29 AM
Tags: California (1), Invasive species (1), pests (2), snails (1)

UC ANR IPM academic coordinator is based at Kearney.

UC ANR IPM academic coordinator is based at Kearney.

Lori Berger is the new academic coordinator for the Pests, Pesticides and IPM Project. Berger joined ANR in 2014 to coordinate a program to identify and manage critical uses of chlorpyrifos in almonds, citrus, cotton and alfalfa. Berger has worked extensively with the regulatory community in developing science-based approaches to pest management and agricultural production, sharing her expertise on pest management, pollinator protection, international MRLs, water quality and soil health.

Based at the Kearney Agricultural Research and Education Center in Parlier, Berger holds a Ph.D. in entomology and is a licensed pest control adviser as well as a certified crop adviser. Read more.

Lori Berger, academic coordinator for the pests, pesticides and IPM project.

Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at 9:57 AM
Tags: IPM (1), MRL (1), pests (2), regulations (1)
 
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